bad-mojo:

defunctparadigm:

This is the Rök Runestone in Östergötland, Sweden. The runes used are the short-twig runes written in an Old Norse dialect, as well as kennings and cipher runes, and is covered by runes on all 5 sides (approximately 760 characters). This is the modern English translation:
In memory of Vémóðr/Vámóðr stand these runes.And Varinn coloured them, the father,in memory of his dead son.
I say the folktale / to the young men, which the two war-booties were, which twelve times were taken as war-booty, both together from various men.
I say this second, who nine generations ago lost his life with the Hreidgoths; and died with them for his guilt.
Þjóðríkr the bold,chief of sea-warriors,ruled over the shores of the Hreiðsea.Now he sits armedon his Goth(ic horse),his shield strapped,the prince of the Mærings.
I say this the twelfth, where the horse of Gunnr sees fodder on the battlefield, where twenty kings lie.
This I say as thirteenth, which twenty kings sat on Sjólund for four winters, of four names, born of four brothers: five Valkis, sons of Hráðulfr, five Hreiðulfrs, sons of Rugulfr, five Háisl, sons of Hôrðr, five Gunnmundrs/Kynmundrs, sons of Bjôrn.
Now I say the tales in full. Someone …
I say the folktale / to the young men, which of the line of Ingold was repaid by a wife’s sacrifice.
I say the folktale / to the young men, to whom is born a relative, to a valiant man. It is Vélinn. He could crush a giant. It is Vélinn … [Nit]
I say the folktale / to the young men: Þórr. Sibbi of Vé, nonagenarian, begot (a son).

I live kinda close to this :D

bad-mojo:

defunctparadigm:

This is the Rök Runestone in Östergötland, Sweden. The runes used are the short-twig runes written in an Old Norse dialect, as well as kennings and cipher runes, and is covered by runes on all 5 sides (approximately 760 characters). This is the modern English translation:

In memory of Vémóðr/Vámóðr stand these runes.
And Varinn coloured them, the father,
in memory of his dead son.

I say the folktale / to the young men, which the two war-booties were, which twelve times were taken as war-booty, both together from various men.

I say this second, who nine generations ago lost his life with the Hreidgoths; and died with them for his guilt.

Þjóðríkr the bold,
chief of sea-warriors,
ruled over the shores of the Hreiðsea.
Now he sits armed
on his Goth(ic horse),
his shield strapped,
the prince of the Mærings.

I say this the twelfth, where the horse of Gunnr sees fodder on the battlefield, where twenty kings lie.

This I say as thirteenth, which twenty kings sat on Sjólund for four winters, of four names, born of four brothers: five Valkis, sons of Hráðulfr, five Hreiðulfrs, sons of Rugulfr, five Háisl, sons of Hôrðr, five Gunnmundrs/Kynmundrs, sons of Bjôrn.

Now I say the tales in full. Someone …

I say the folktale / to the young men, which of the line of Ingold was repaid by a wife’s sacrifice.

I say the folktale / to the young men, to whom is born a relative, to a valiant man. It is Vélinn. He could crush a giant. It is Vélinn … [Nit]

I say the folktale / to the young men: Þórr. Sibbi of Vé, nonagenarian, begot (a son).

I live kinda close to this :D

Reblogged from talltrees-deactivated20121003

fuckyeahvalhalla:

Mead, also called honey wine, is an alcoholic beverage that is produced by fermenting a solution of honey and water.
Mead is known from many sources of ancient history throughout Europe, Africa, and Asia, although archaeological evidence of it is ambiguous. Its origins are lost in pre-history. 
Mead has played an important role in the beliefs and mythology of some peoples. One such example, the Mead of Poetry, is a mead of Norse mythology crafted from the blood of the wise being Kvasir which turns the drinker into a poet or scholar.

fuckyeahvalhalla:

Mead, also called honey wine, is an alcoholic beverage that is produced by fermenting a solution of honey and water.

Mead is known from many sources of ancient history throughout Europe, Africa, and Asia, although archaeological evidence of it is ambiguous. Its origins are lost in pre-history

Mead has played an important role in the beliefs and mythology of some peoples. One such example, the Mead of Poetry, is a mead of Norse mythology crafted from the blood of the wise being Kvasir which turns the drinker into a poet or scholar.

Reblogged from bregma

mediumaevum:

 
Medieval Lemon Cake Recipe
ORIGINAL RECEIPT:
Take fine flowre and good Damaske water you must have no other liquor but that, then take sweet butter, two or three yolkes of egges and a good quantity of Suger, and a fewe cloues, and mace, as your Cookes mouth shall serue him, and a lyttle saffron, and a little Gods good about a sponfull if you put in too much they shall arise, cutte them in squares lyke vnto trenchers, and pricke them well, and let your ouen be well swept and lay them vppon papers and so set them into the ouen. Do not burne them if they be three or foure dayes olde they bee the better.
- Dawson, Thomas. The good huswifes Iewell. London: Edward White, 1596.
Our Changes: To make these lemony cakes, we added lemon zest to the dough, and basted the finished cookies in a lemon-honey sauce.  We also took out the rosewater to eliminated possible flavor rivalry.
Ingredients:
3 Tbs. butter, softened
1/4 heaping cup sugar
3 egg yolks
zest from one lemon
1/2 tsp. hartshorn (or baking soda), dissolved in 1 tsp. of hot water
1/4 tsp. each salt, cloves and mace
pinch saffron
1 1/4 cup sifted all-purpose flour
juice from one lemon
1 tbs honey
Cream together the butter & sugar until smooth; beat in the egg yolks. Blend in the dissolved hartshorn or baking soda, then the zest, salt & spices. Stir in the flour and work until a ball of dough is formed. Knead gently until smooth, working in more flour if necessary.
Roll out the dough on a floured surface to a 1/4 ” thickness. With a floured butter knife, cut the dough into small squares or rectangles. Make decorative vent holes on the cakes by pricking with a fork, then place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
Bake in a preheated 300° F oven for 14-15 minutes until just done. Be sure that they do not brown on the bottom. Cool on a wire rack.  While they are cooling, mix the lemon juice and honey together in a pan on the stove, over low heat.  Let cool slightly before brushing onto cakes, and store in an air-tight container.
Cook’s Notes: Fun fact!  Hartshorn, an early predecessor of baking soda, was literally made from reindeer antlers, or “hart’s horns”.  It can still be purchased today, and gives baked goods an extra crispness.

mediumaevum:

Medieval Lemon Cake Recipe

ORIGINAL RECEIPT:

Take fine flowre and good Damaske water you must have no other liquor but that, then take sweet butter, two or three yolkes of egges and a good quantity of Suger, and a fewe cloues, and mace, as your Cookes mouth shall serue him, and a lyttle saffron, and a little Gods good about a sponfull if you put in too much they shall arise, cutte them in squares lyke vnto trenchers, and pricke them well, and let your ouen be well swept and lay them vppon papers and so set them into the ouen. Do not burne them if they be three or foure dayes olde they bee the better.

- Dawson, Thomas. The good huswifes Iewell. London: Edward White, 1596.

Our Changes: To make these lemony cakes, we added lemon zest to the dough, and basted the finished cookies in a lemon-honey sauce.  We also took out the rosewater to eliminated possible flavor rivalry.

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tbs. butter, softened
  • 1/4 heaping cup sugar
  • 3 egg yolks
  • zest from one lemon
  • 1/2 tsp. hartshorn (or baking soda), dissolved in 1 tsp. of hot water
  • 1/4 tsp. each salt, cloves and mace
  • pinch saffron
  • 1 1/4 cup sifted all-purpose flour
  • juice from one lemon
  • 1 tbs honey

Cream together the butter & sugar until smooth; beat in the egg yolks. Blend in the dissolved hartshorn or baking soda, then the zest, salt & spices. Stir in the flour and work until a ball of dough is formed. Knead gently until smooth, working in more flour if necessary.

Roll out the dough on a floured surface to a 1/4 ” thickness. With a floured butter knife, cut the dough into small squares or rectangles. Make decorative vent holes on the cakes by pricking with a fork, then place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

Bake in a preheated 300° F oven for 14-15 minutes until just done. Be sure that they do not brown on the bottom. Cool on a wire rack.  While they are cooling, mix the lemon juice and honey together in a pan on the stove, over low heat.  Let cool slightly before brushing onto cakes, and store in an air-tight container.

Cook’s Notes: Fun fact!  Hartshorn, an early predecessor of baking soda, was literally made from reindeer antlers, or “hart’s horns”.  It can still be purchased today, and gives baked goods an extra crispness.

Reblogged from mediumaevum