The six-board chest was a common piece of furniture throughout the medieval era, with variations common in all European cultures. It´s quite versatile, since it can be used for storage, seating, or as a table. Handles make it portable. I´ve found these will hold all the usual gear (clothes, shoes, mug) for one person for a weekend event. This particular version is modelled on 14th and 15th century examples, but the basic chest is equally appropriate for the 12th Century as well. The six-board chest is made, of course, from six boards nailed together – top, bottom, sides, and two legs, which are extended to the ground. The legs (ends) are the key pieces - each as a notch in each side to accommodate the two side boards, a dado (groove) across the middle to help hold the bottom in place, and finally a cutout on the bottom edge to form the feet. Just cut everything out and nail it together. Easy, right? Well, yes, but a little planning and a few tips will make it go faster and let you learn from some of my mistakes.
http://www.threeriver.org/marshal/chest_1.shtml

I like the look of this chest with 12 boards instead of 6 because I always did my shoulder butt joint half way up the side boards. Like the one below.

The six-board chest was a common piece of furniture throughout the medieval era, with variations common in all European cultures. It´s quite versatile, since it can be used for storage, seating, or as a table. Handles make it portable. I´ve found these will hold all the usual gear (clothes, shoes, mug) for one person for a weekend event. This particular version is modelled on 14th and 15th century examples, but the basic chest is equally appropriate for the 12th Century as well.

The six-board chest is made, of course, from six boards nailed together – top, bottom, sides, and two legs, which are extended to the ground. The legs (ends) are the key pieces - each as a notch in each side to accommodate the two side boards, a dado (groove) across the middle to help hold the bottom in place, and finally a cutout on the bottom edge to form the feet. Just cut everything out and nail it together. Easy, right? Well, yes, but a little planning and a few tips will make it go faster and let you learn from some of my mistakes.

http://www.threeriver.org/marshal/chest_1.shtml

I like the look of this chest with 12 boards instead of 6 because I always did my shoulder butt joint half way up the side boards. Like the one below.

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